The Kaleidoscope Shawl: a free crochet pattern for you!

Hi Crochet Lovers!

You need to hear about some amazing things happening with my Kaleidoscope Shawl, a lovely–and free–crochet shawl pattern I placed with Red Heart several months ago.



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Kaleidoscope Shawl by Sara Kay Hartmann



I got so excited when I learned that the Kaleidoscope Shawl is part of an ebook collection called–get this–Coffee and Yarning.

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Um, I don’t know about you, but coffee and yarning is the story of my life.

Or at least I want it to be. How about you? 🙂

I really love this part…Marly Bird is offering an instructional video on how to crochet the Kaleidoscope Shawl.

I was so happy to learn about this, I had to share the videos right here with you on the blog.

There are instructions tailored to both right-handed and left-handed crocheters!



The stitch patterns are quite easy and add up to a bigger effect than you would think from their simplicity.



And the yarn choice has everything to do with that!

Long color repeats create a beautiful stained-glass effect that looks as if you worked an awful lot of stripes after spending hours in the yarn shop selecting a perfectly harmonious color palette.

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Kaleidoscope Shawl by Sara Kay Hartmann

But that’s all done for you with Red Heart’s Unforgettable yarn. I loved the Tealberry colorway they sent me.

I’m also a sucker for a singles-ply. The softness, the shine, the texture of the finished stitches, the light twist of the yarn. Mmm! So pretty.

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Red Heart Unforgettable: Colorway Tealberry



After discovering her videos, I’m going nuts for the yarn Marly used in her version of Kaleidoscope. After doing a little detective work, I’m pretty sure it’s the Parrot colorway.

I gotta make something with this!

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Red Heart Unforgettable: Colorway Parrot

Gorgeous. So bright and happy. I just love color.

What do you look for in your favorite crochet shawls?

I’m obsessed with shawls again and am in the process of designing and testing a brand new collection as I write this post. It’s been so much fun, and deeply satisfying to return to my love of designing shawls and wraps.



You can take a look at the first indie shawl collection I put together after publishing Poetic Crochet: 20 Shawls Inspired by Classic Poems.

 

Shawls Ebook Cover

Shawls by Sara Kay: PDF ebook collection, $17.95



I love bundling my patterns into collections that offer you a big discount on the individual pattern price.

Everyone loves a bundle, right?



You can read this post to learn more about the first beauty in the new collection lineup, or see my full set of shawl pattern releases on Ravelry.



I hope you enjoy the Kaleidoscope Shawl. Please tag me @sarakayhartmann on IG if you make it, or any of my patterns!

Yours ever in a tangle of yarn,

Sara 



Candy Shop Crochet Cardigan

candy shop cardi.jpg

Hi Crocheters,

Today, I’m sharing my first crocheted granny square sweater design with you.

How I love a granny square sweater! I’m forever collecting these colorful wonders of happy crochet goodness on Pinterest.



I recently finished a tiny granny square sweater for my daughter. The Candy Shop Cardigan sweater is my own design, sized for 2T-3T. I have not produced a full pattern for this design, but below I am sharing a tutorial if you’d like to make your own version!

Missie loves her sweater, and it’s been the perfect substitute for her winter coat this spring with all the cool, rainy days and chilly mornings we’ve had. She often goes to the peg where it hangs and reaches for it. It warms my heart that she loves her colorful crochet! It makes weaving in all those yarn ends totally worth it.



And there are a lot, believe me.

A. Lot.

😉

Miss Mouse is awfully sweet! But do you see a glint of mischief in her eyes? I do.
This book is appropriate for working with geometric motifs!
Sure enough, she goes right to a tiny square.
Mama’s gonna kiss those cheeks!
You like spunk? We’ve got spunk for days.
Colorful ribbing at the neck and hem reminds me of candy straws.
Choosing buttons was tricky, but I thought, “why hold back?…”
…because color makes my heart go pitter-pat.
♥ Ta-Da! The incredibly sweet Candy Shop Cardigan ♥

Tutorial

Sweater Specs:

Size 2T-3T

Finished Chest Circumference: 26.5″

Finished Length (shoulder to hem): 11.5″ This is slightly cropped jacket length on my LSG, but she has a long waist and is getting closer to 3T size these days.

Finished Measurement of Center Back Neck to Cuff: 17″

Button Front Cardigan (you’ll need six 1 1/8″ buttons)

Drop shoulder shape

Crew neck

Long sleeves

Hook:

Size G US/6 4.00 mm crochet hook

Yarn:

DK weight (#3 Light)

60% acrylic/40% polyamide

I used 17 skeins in a rainbow of candy colors

Brand: Baby Bee Sweet Delight from Hobby Lobby



Gauge: 

Each Tiny Square = 1.9″ square worked in DK weight yarn on size G/6 (4.0 mm) hook.

How to make a Tiny Granny Square:


With First Color

Make adjustable ring.

Round 1: Ch 3, 2 dc (ch 2-3 dc) 3 times into ring, ch 2, slip stitch to top of turning chain to close round.

Fasten off. Break yarn leaving 6″ tail

With Second Color

Round 2: Join yarn at any 2-chain space, ch 3, 2 dc-ch 2-3 dc in same 2-chain space, (3dc – ch 2 – 3 dc in next 2-chain space) 3 times, slip stitch to top of turning chain to close round.



Fasten off. Break yarn leaving 6″ tail.

How to make a Tiny Triangle:


With First Color



Make adjustable ring.

Round 1: Ch 4 (counts as dc + 1 chain), 3 dc – ch 2 – 3 dc, ch 1, dc into ring, do not turn.

Round 2: with RS of motif facing you, slip stitch to top of turning chain to close round.

With Second Color

Round 2: With right side of motif facing you, join yarn at first chain space, ch 4 (counts as dc + 1 chain), 3 dc in same chain space (3 dc – ch 2 – 3 dc) in next 2-chain space, (3 dc – ch 1 – dc) in last chain-space.

Tips:

  • After making a square, tighten center yarn tail of adjustable ring and take time to weave in yarn ends after each square or after each sitting. This project has a lot of yarn ends.
  • Try to work colors randomly to create that delightful candy shop effect. Avoid making the same sequence of colors for an unstudied effect of joyous color!
  • Take your time with the layout of squares to make sure you don’t have areas of similar color clustering together.
  • I learned a great trick for working with color from an interview with the amazing needle artist and colorist, Kaffe Fassett–squint your eyes and see what color jumps out at you and says it isn’t working. I have been doing this and it’s really helped! I did this a lot in the yarn shop when I was buying my huge palette of yarns.



To Make the Sweater:

Make 113 Tiny Granny Squares.

Make 6 Tiny Triangles.

Use the diagram below to lay out your squares. Note that the red squares and triangles represent the motifs and the orange edges represent the ribbed bands, cuffs, and button bands.

Tiny Square and Tiny Triangle Layout

Take your time to make sure you have the squares placed just as you want them. You may need to take a break and come back with fresh eyes. Try the squinting trick! (See Tips).

I spent awhile fussing with my layout to make sure no colors were too close to each other.

Oops! I’m missing a square at the right neck edge!

Join your squares and triangles into rows, then join rows to rows.



I held my motifs together with right sides facing and slip-stitched the back loops of the V’s on top of the stitches.

For more help with joining, see this lovely tutorial .

The yarn ends never seem (seam?) to, err…end (heh heh).

Finishing

Slip stitch or seam sleeve and body seams together at right side and left side of sweater.

Hem Rib:



With the right side of the sweater facing you, join a color at the Left Front hem corner.

Row 1 (RS): Ch 2, hdc an odd number of stitches evenly across hem, turn. Fasten off, break yarn leaving a 6″ tail.

Row 2: With a new color, ch 2 (counts as 1 fphdc/front-post half double crochet), *bphdc/back-post half double crochet in next st, fphdc in next st; repeat from *, turn. Fasten off, break yarn leaving a 6″ tail.

Row 3-8: Use a new color for every row. Ch 2 (counts as post stitch), work each stitch as it presents itself. If it appears as a fphdc, work an fphdc over that stitch and if it appears as a bphdc, work a bphdc over that stitch. Fasten off, break yarn leaving a 6″ tail.

Row 9: Use the same color you used in Row 1. Repeat Row 3.Fasten off, break yarn leaving a 6″ tail.

Neckband:

With the right side of the sweater facing you, join a color at the Right Front neck corner.



Use same color sequence as for Hem Rib.

Work Rows 1-9 as for Hem Rib.

Button Band:

With the right side of the sweater facing you, join a color at the Neckband corner of the Left Front.

Use same color sequence as for Hem Rib.

Work Rows 1-9 as for Hem Rib.

Buttonhole Band:

With the right side of the sweater facing you, join a color at the Hem Rib edge of the Right Front.

Use same color sequence as for Hem Rib.

Work Rows 1-4 as for Hem Rib.

Row 5: Create 6 evenly spaced buttonholes by skipping 2 post-stitches and chaining 2 over the top of them, work in pattern between the buttonholes. Fasten off, break yarn leaving a 6″ tail, turn.

Row 6: Work in pattern, working 2 hdc in each 2-chain space you come to, working in pattern between buttonholes. Fasten off, break yarn leaving a 6″ tail, turn.

Rows 7-9: Work as for Hem Rib.

Cuffs (make 2):

With right side of sweater facing, join a color at the seam of a sleeve opening.

Use same color sequence as for Rows 1-3 of Hem Rib.

Work Rows 1-3 as for Hem Rib.

Row 4: Use same color as for Row 1. Work as for Hem Rib.

Blocking:

I blocked this sweater using gentle steam from a garment steamer.

Later I also pressed it under a warm iron and a press cloth–VERY IMPORTANT.



I love working with acrylic yarns and blends because you can adjust the size and enhance the drape of a sweater with steam/heat. Just be careful and always experiment on swatches first. Okay? Okay.

Care:

This sweater would be machine washable based on its yarn selection, HOWEVER, I would only hand-wash this on very rare occasions to avoid any trouble with the yarn ends coming loose in the washing machine. I’m a little paranoid about it after a certain heart-breaking episode that involved a freshly completed baby blanket and washing machine spin cycle. But that is a story for another time when I have an adult beverage in hand.

Anyway!

There you have it! My tutorial for the Candy Shop Cardigan.

If you think doing this much work to create a sweater for a toddler who loves playing in the dirt and is growing like a weed is CRAZY…

…you have a point.

But I loved making this project. Yes, it was a big challenge with tons of finishing details, but I loved playing with all these colors and get lots of sweet satisfaction when I see my little gal looking warm and happy in it. A happy make!

Now I want one for myself, but I’ll have to let my stamina build up again. Do you think this style would be wearable for an adult? I’d probably use a palette of soft, dusty colors and make it from sport-weight wool. That way it would last my entire lifetime.

It had better!

 

p.s. If you enjoyed this post, check out my post about creative projects you can make with just a few granny squares!

Yours in Stitches,

Sara

A little CoD, anyone? 😉




 

 

 

Red Heart Yarns: Fantastic Ripple Scarf

Hi Knitting Friends,

My needles were clicking fast back in January, and now I can share this fun freelance knitting pattern I designed for Red Heart Yarns: the Fantastic Ripple Scarf!

photo credit: redheart.com

 

photo credit: redheart.com

The scarf is a single repeat of traditional Old Shale lace, edged with garter stitch, and the coolest thing about it is that Marly Bird will actually teach you how to knit the lace in a video tutorial she did for Red Heart!

I hope you enjoy this free knitting pattern!

Yours in Stitches,

Sara